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Brain-Regulated Exoskeleton Powers Paralyzed Patient to Walk

Brain-Controlled Exoskeleton Enables Paralyzed Patient to Walk The device cannot be used outside of the lab yet, but the outcomes are bright. Aquadriplegic patient has walked again acknowledgments to a brain-controlled robotic exoskeleton suit being well-tried in the lab, according to a group of investigators in France. Their assemblage were published (October 3) in The Lancet Neurology. Thibault (whose last name was withheld for privacy), 28 years old at the occurrence of the two-year study, was paralyzed from the shoulders down after a cervical spinal cord injury. Researchers constituted two recording devices on the surface of his brain to accumulate and transmit brain signals. The signals were interpreted into motions with a decoding algorithm, which then sent commands to the exoskeleton. Thibault was able to complete various movement tasks such as walking and reaching for targets, according to a press release.
Source: Brain-Controlled Exoskeleton Enables Paralyzed Patient to Walk | The Scientist Magazine®

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